Jeff Shauger, Associate Broker, ABR, CDPE, CRS, ePRO, GRI , SRES, SRS
 
Jeff Shauger, Associate Broker, ABR, CDPE, CRS, ePRO, GRI , SRES, SRS

Jeff's Blog

How to Help Your Kids Adjust to Glasses

March 31, 2017 12:33 am

Change can be difficult for all of us, but for children, a large change like getting glasses for the first time can be stressful and nerve-wracking.

"Most children just want to fit in and not stand out from their peers," explained  Amanda Thompson, PhD, a pediatric psychologist in Washington, D.C. "Anything that makes them feel different, including something as minor as needing to wear glasses, may impact a young child's confidence."
With increased use of electronic devices (shown to strain eyes at  faster rate), more and more children are in need of glasses at a younger age than ever before. To soften this transition to wearing glasses, Dr. Thompson shares these tips for parents:

Normalize the experience of wearing glasses.

Helping children to see glasses as common and "normal" is a great way to make them feel less "different." Read books about characters that wear glasses. Point out people in their life who wear glasses—a classmate, a favorite teacher, their baseball coach.  

Involve children in picking out and customizing their glasses.

Let them try on different colors and shapes and have a say in picking their favorite. This helps give them a sense of control and feel more connected to and invested in their new accessory. Glasses become something special to show off, rather than something to keep hidden in their backpack.

Provide lots of positive attention and specific praise for wearing glasses.

Plain and simple: kids respond to positive attention. Providing praise for wearing glasses encourages them to keep at it! Be specific and tell them, "I love when you wear your glasses. You look so smart!" Or, "I'm so glad you are wearing your glasses to do your homework. I'm really proud of you."

Deal with teasing if it occurs.

If your child tells you they are being teased, praise them for letting you know (it can be hard), calmly listen, and validate their feelings. Communicate that teasing is unfair, unkind, and hurtful, and then talk about some ways to deal with teasing if it happens again. Role-playing can be a helpful practice. 

Source: www.GlassesUSA.com.

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Positive Trends to Emerge for Buyers in 2017

March 30, 2017 1:08 pm

In 2016, home prices experienced increases, despite the predictions of many that prices would fall for the first time since the recovery began. Home price gains were buoyed mostly by limited inventory, with entry-level homes being particularly short in supply. Many areas across the country saw sales prices touch their pre-2007 values, while mortgage rates […]

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With American Home Shield®, All Systems Are Go

March 30, 2017 1:08 pm

NAR PULSE—A home warranty offer is available to members of the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) from American Home Shield®. Coverage now includes the same features previously only available as part of a real estate transaction. As always, NAR members enjoy a $50 savings through NAR’s REALTOR Benefits® Program. Learn more. Are You Reaching Millennials […]

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Hispanic Homeownership Rate Rises for Second Straight Year

March 30, 2017 1:08 pm

Momentum Could Be Cut Short If Trump Carries Out Mass Deportation, Wall Hispanics are an overriding force in homeownership, flouting national figures as they establish owner households at a rising rate for the second straight year. According to the National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals’ (NAHREP) recently released 2016 State of Hispanic Homeownership Report, […]

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Bookworms: Here’s Where to Move If You Like to Read

March 30, 2017 1:08 pm

Editor’s Note: This was originally published on RISMedia’s blog, Housecall. See what else is cookin’ now at blog.rismedia.com: Live Like Country King and Queen Johnny Cash and June Carter How to Decide If Your Dream Home Is a Good Deal Now You Can Own Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi’s Santa Barbara Villa It’s a […]

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Working Together to Achieve Real Estate Success

March 30, 2017 1:08 pm

In the following interview, Julie Jones-Bernard, broker/owner of Florida Luxurious Properties in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., discusses marketing listings. Region Served: South Florida Years in Real Estate: 17 Number of Offices: 1 Number of Agents: 25 Favorite Part of Your Job: Helping both U.S. and global customers achieve their real estate goals and smoothly integrate into […]

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NAR Video Spotlight: 2017 New Member Orientation

March 30, 2017 1:08 pm

Editor’s Note: This is part of a monthly video series from the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) to inform and educate members about important aspects of being a real estate professional. Watch for this series each month in RISMedia’s Daily e-News. The National Association of REALTORS®’ (NAR) new 2017 Orientation Video includes an introduction by […]

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Prepare for a Real Estate Rush This Spring

March 30, 2017 1:08 pm

Homebuyers this spring will meet out-of-this-world prices and unsparing competition—a real estate rush. According to Clear Capital’s recently released Home Data Index (HDI) Market Report, the national median days on market is 43 days, down from an 85-day stretch seen in January 2012. Days on market in Denver, Colo., Lincoln, Neb., and Raleigh, N.C., are […]

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Pending Home Sales Warm Up in February

March 30, 2017 1:08 pm

Pending home sales warmed in February to their highest level in almost a year, rallying 5.5 percent in the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) recently released Pending Home Sales Index (PHSI). The PHSI posted 112.3 in February, up from 106.4 in January—the second-highest reading since May 2006, at 112.5. The Index is based on contract […]

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How to Stay Safe in a Power Outage

March 24, 2017 1:18 am

Whether it’s a bad storm or a downed utility pole, power outages can strike at any time. While most only last for a couple of hours, a prolonged power outage presents a whole host of obstacles. Here’s how to make sure your home and your family stay safe next time you lose electricity:

- Stay far away from downed power lines and any debris those power lines are in contact with; they have the capability of delivering a fatal charge. Wait for your utility company to take care of the problem.

- If flood waters in your basement are covering utility outlets, do not step into the water. Call your utility company and have them turn the water off at the meter.

- If using a generator, make sure nothing is plugged into the generator when you turn it on. Operate generators in well-ventilated, dry outdoor areas.

- While power is out, be sure to turn off all electronics, otherwise your circuits could overload when power is restored. Leave one light on so that you’ll know when power is back.

- For lighting, stick to flashlights not candles to avoid fire hazards.

- Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible. According to the American Red Cross, an unopened refrigerator will keep foods cold for about four hours. A full freezer will keep the temperature for about 48 hours (24 hours if it is half full) if the door remains closed.

- Avoid traveling, especially at night. With traffic lights and street lamps out, driving becomes hazardous.

When power returns, continue to avoid downed power lines and examine food carefully - throw anything away that you suspect may have gone bad while unrefrigerated. If you hadn’t done so already, make an emergency supply kit with dry food, water, batteries, flashlights, blankets, etc. so you’ll be well-prepared next time the lights go out.

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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